Reviews: Hobbit, Wolf of Wall Street, Catching Fire and More


Long time no see! Reviews have been irregular lately but I wanted to start 2014 with an easy round up to get back on track. I’ve seen a lot of movies over the past few months and I wanted to write down a few quick thoughts on each one. Moving forward the review schedule will be a lot more lax than it used to be but I’m aiming to get back to writing more than I have these last four months. Somewhere along the way I felt like these reviews became very mechanical and emotionless which got away from what I really loved. I want to dial it back and focus less on formality and more on writing about films I enjoy. Anyway, here we go. First up, Ender’s Game.

Ender’s Game

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Ender’s Game was a major disappoint for me. The two weeks leading up to the film’s release I read the novel and was instantly hooked. I fell in love with the characters and was immersed in the constant struggles Ender faced. The movie does away with a lot of this struggle and instead focuses more on flashy action scenes. The battle room, which served as a major chunk of the novel, is skimmed over rather quickly along with all the relationships Ender cultivated with his time there. I never got the sense of Ender becoming the respected leader he was in the books. Also the dynamic between Bonzo and Ender is completely ruined due to a rather unfortunate casting choice that causes far more unintentional humor than it should. Simply put, the film hits the high points that were in the book but without the proper time to breathe it felt like a waste of time amounting to nothing more than popcorn fluff. I wish I could remember the Reddit user to give them proper credit but they summed it up perfectly. The Ender’s Game movie is as good an adaptation as watching someone’s vacation slideshow is a good vacation.

Thor: The Dark World

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Thor: The Dark World was satisfyingly entertaining, far more so than Iron Man 3. It was nice to get a deeper look at Asgard and how that side of the universe lives. The movie started off a little slow for me but it definitely picked up once Thor and Loki partnered up. My only concern is the film’s understandable love affair with Loki. Despite their dynamic stealing the show and being the source of the film’s fun, I felt like the film dropped all other aspects of the story to showcase them. I like Loki enough that I don’t want his character to outstay his welcome. For what it is though, Thor: The Dark World is a solid action film. I was a little surprised how much the early parts of the film reminded me of the Star Wars Prequels, in a good way of course.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

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I was caught off guard with how much I enjoyed The Hunger Games when it first released in 2012. It was a decent film and covered enough of the books for me to be happy with it. Although my interest in the film didn’t make it through all the books, specifically the third entry, my interest was still piqued for the films. Catching Fire is an incredible follow up to The Hunger Games and delivers on intense action guided by strong performances. I was impressed with Catching Fire’s ability to incite so much anxiety within me, particularly in a scene involving a swarm of Jabber Jays that did a wonderful job of conveying great panic.

One of my complaints with the first film is the way it got away with a lot of the violence by quick cutting before a character died. It was somewhat of an understandable distraction but it was still off-putting nonetheless. Catching Fire’s strength this time around is the fact that the dangers Katniss faces is more elemental based than combat based allowing for the film to be more lenient with its violence and action. It was a much more immersive experience for me this time around it made the film a lot more enjoyable. Doubt it’ll convert any new fans but it’s definitely worth the time for those who already bought in the first go around.

Frozen

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Frozen was far more enjoyable than I expected and I happily ate crow for all my previous doubts. It’s a great throwback to traditional Disney musicals and features an impressive track of catchy songs, some of which I may or may not have had on repeat in my car for days after. The story plays wonderfully on old Disney princess tropes and provides a nice message for young audiences. It’s a simple story but the execution is charming enough to be entertaining for all ages. The animation itself is wonderfully done and features incredibly beautiful scenery. I wasn’t completely sold on the character models themselves, which at times felt too clean like they were something straight out of a direct to DVD Barbie movie. However this could have been a creative choice, as the character models feel more natural as the movie progresses further into its adventures outside the fairy tale setting. If you’re a fan of animation, especially old Disney films, than this film is a must see film.

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

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I’ve been conflicted on my feelings for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug for quite a while. The same old song and dance is that the decision to split this simple story into three films would be too much of a good thing. The Jackson Lord of the Rings fan boy in me was thrilled for a new trilogy but it’s never been more evident than with Desolation of Smaug that this may not have been the right choice after all. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed my time with Desolation of Smaug but it’s far from a film I would recommend to anyone. It feels like a series of inside jokes or stories that fans will enjoy but for everyone else it feels like it spends a lot of time accomplishing nothing.

The biggest crime the film commits is the gradual shift in focus from Bilbo to the dwarves almost completely. It’s somewhat understandable given that the Dwarves’ quest translates more to exciting cinema than Bilbo’s story but it’s only frustrating when the film decides to spend it’s screen time on superfluous subplots instead. The Legolas, Kili, and Tauriel love triangle is completely unnecessary, especially given the fact that we’re rushed through great moments from the book like Beorn’s House, Mirkwood, and the Wood Elves prison. It’s just a shame that for a movie called The Hobbit, the time we spend with the hobbit has slowly diminished. Overall it’s a narrative mess that feels like it’s obviously been spread way to thin.  Despite these troubling decisions, the film more than makes up for it with the outstanding River Barrel scene and it’s wonderful depiction of Smaug.

Smaug in particular is truly a great spectacle and is the series greatest animated character since Gollum. The dragon is emanating with power and ferocity that commands your attention every second he’s on screen. The dialogue between Bilbo and Smaug is wonderfully playful and conveys such a great sense of power Smaug holds over Bilbo. The film (surprise surprise) takes liberties with the Lonely Mountain scenes but by that point I was more than willing to forgive it and enjoy the ride. As enjoyable as these films are, in the end I can’t help but wish for a tighter film that focuses more on adapting The Hobbit than being inspired by it.

The Wolf of Wall Street

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The Wolf of Wall Street is vile, unapologetic, and downright immoral, but I loved every second of it. It’s definitely not a film for the faint of heart but if you’re willing to join the ride it’s an incredibly bizarre trip. Sex, drugs and alcohol dominates the life of Jordan Belfort and watching the slow descent into depravity and madness is a train wreck that you can’t look away from. The film’s humor is definitely dark and often reaches such ridiculous levels that you can’t help but burst out laughing. American greed through the eyes of Scorsese is extremely uncomfortable and brutally savage. Leonardo DiCaprio gives an absolutely remarkable performance that blurs the line of insanity and absurdity, undeniably making Jordan Belfort DiCaprio’s craziest character yet. Jonah Hill also delivers a wonderful performance that shows the actors incredible range of talent. Hill and DiCaprio share a wonderful on screen dynamic that is the heart of the film’s humor.

The thing I loved the most about this film is the way it’s able to bring the audience crashing down to reality no matter how bizarre the rampant drug fueled escapades ran out of control. There’s such a stark contrast between the seemingly invincible wolves of Wall Street and the real world people that they’re affecting as well as the real danger that they’re putting themselves through. It’s these brief reminders throughout the film that provides a quick realistic glimpse of the self-centered protagonist that the film seemingly shines a glamorous light on. It’s a subtle touch but it’s the point of the film that there is no moral compass here. We’re supposed to be upset and bothered by the film.

I’ll concede the movie isn’t for everyone though. Much like Jordan Belfort, the movie doesn’t know when to quit. I felt like the film could be trimmed down to make a tighter movie, and the excessive narration can feel a little spoon-fed at times. The Wolf of Wall Street may end up being my guilty pleasure, but it’s a film that more than deserves your time at least once. Oh, and trust me when I say this film earns it’s hard R rating.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at ThinkCinematicReviews@gmail.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @TreyRSolis
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: ThinkCinematicReviews@Gmail.com

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Miami International Auto Show


In honor of the Miami International Auto Show the fine folks over at Priority One Jets have started a discussion on the most iconic cars from the big screen. They’ve asked me to help share their post as well as add a few thoughts on a car that I believe to be iconic. First off let’s look at a couple examples that they’ve come up with followed by my own inclusion at the end.

This week, thousands will be traveling to Miami for one of the largest and most prestigious car shows in the nation. In honor of the Miami International Auto Show (November 8th- November 17th), we have compiled a list of some of the most iconic cars in film and television. Whether you plan oncatching a private jet to Miami, or just following the action through your computer screen, auto enthusiasts will be left begging for more!

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Aston Martin DB5

Skyfall: “Bond. James Bond.” Besides having one of the most recognized phrases in movie history, the quintessential spy films are also famous for their lust-worthy selection of automobiles. Considered by the Aston Martin company as “one of the most iconic cars ever produced”, the DB5 model has appeared in 6 of the Bond films. From its film debut in 1964’s “Goldfinger” to a small-scale 3D printed replica in  “Skyfall”, the Aston Martin DB5 continues to be an irreplaceable piece of Bond history.

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Lincoln Continental

The Godfather: Hailed as one of the greatest gangster films of all time, Frances Ford Coppola immortalized the Lincoln Continental for both movie and car enthusiasts all over. The two most recognizable models are the Limousine and the Coupe, which were featured in pivotal moments such as (Spoiler Alert!) Sonny Corleone’s untimely demise. In January 2013, two of the vehicles used in the film were auctioned off for a cool $120,750. Guess they made him an offer he couldn’t refuse!

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1992-1993 Ford Explorer XLTs 

Jurassic Park: Now I feel obligated to preface this by saying you’ll never find anyone more useless than me when it comes to vehicles but if I had to choose an iconic car it would be the Ford Explorer XLT from Jurassic Park (1993).  The vibrant greens, yellows, and reds of the custom painted tour vehicle easily stood out in the film and are featured in some of the most memorable scenes from the classic film. The Ford Explorers are such a huge centerpiece for our first introduction to the T-Rex that they’re nearly inseparable. Whether it’s being pushed off a ledge, or being smashed through the sunroof, the Ford Explorers XLTs served it’s purpose through some truly gripping and terrorizing scenes, easily becoming an iconic piece of cinema.

For the full list of iconic cars and more sure to head on over to Priority One Jets and join in on the conversation!

Oz the Great and Powerful


Oz the Great and Powerful features shallow characters, save for two wonderfully written and acted side characters. The movie is earnest and it’s easy to see that it was trying to work with what it had but vanilla story arcs and predictability hamper the film. The antagonists don’t feel that menacing and have motivations that make the film feel like a high school teen drama. Visually the movie is a grab bag ranging from breathtaking scenes to distracting CGI that feel like the movie focused more on showing off its technical prowess than working on story. Story arcs aren’t fully realized on screen and there’s an overall shallow feel to the film. However, the strong second half features enough heart and charm in its characters to pass as a children’s adventure story for the more forgiving fans and families.


Aiming to recapture the magic and wonder of the 1939 classic, Oz the Great and Powerful released this past Friday. Starring Mila Kunis, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, Zach Braff, and James Franco this spiritual prequel is directed by Sam Raimi and released on theaters everywhere March 8th, 2013.

Oz the Great and Powerful

Oz the Great and Powerful tells the story of Oscar Diggs (Franco), aka Oz, who is circus magician in a travelling circus. He is a womanizing con artist who uses cheap tricks to lure in audiences. He performs with his assistant Frank (Braff), who sticks with his friend no matter how badly Oz treats him. When an angered strongman discovers that Oz has been talking to his girlfriend he chases Oz throughout the circus but not before Oz escapes in an air balloon. Thinking that he has finally escaped, Oz gets sucked into a cyclone that will forever change his life.

My biggest problem with Oz the Great and Powerful is the fact that the film’s main protagonist is one dimensional and unlikeable. I understand that this is set up for his character arc but it’s not satisfying and by the time everything is wrapped you could argue that Oz doesn’t change that much at all. He remains somewhat egotistical, as can be seen in one of the scenes involving gifts, and shows a very shallow remorse for the characters he affected with his actions. There’s very little change and redemption for Oscar Diggs, and although you can see where they were trying to go with the character I don’t feel that it was fully realized on screen. James Franco brings enough charm to the character to make him entertaining, but at the end of the film I just didn’t feel like he was a well-written protagonist.

Even the antagonists of the film seem so underdeveloped with motivations that make the movie feel like a high school teen drama. There’s not enough time dedicated to establish characters and prove their villainy, and instead we are given rushed plot twists that are underwhelming and predictable. In fact, almost all the antagonists’ terrible actions are done off screen. The rest of the film is just chasing characters from one scene to the next. It’s hard to be a great movie when both your protagonist and your antagonists are so underdeveloped, but luckily for Oz the Great and Powerful there are two side characters that make the film fun.

Both Finley (Braff) the flying monkey and China (Joey King) the china doll are wonderfully voiced and are such loveable characters. It took a little while to warm up to Finley but the endearing personality and humorous asides make Finley a great companion for Oz. Braff’s comedic style is a hit and miss but the jokes he delivers are all perfectly timed. Stylistically I wasn’t as impressed with Finley’s CGI. He often stuck out and felt like his character design could have used more polish. China on the other hand is both wonderfully animated and a great character. The introduction of China was one of the more powerful scenes of the film and one of the few scenes where we do see some change in Oz. Joey King does a wonderful job of voicing the ambitious but fragile character and ended up making China my favorite character of the movie. Together these two lovable side characters bring enough fun and entertainment to the film help save it from its otherwise lack luster characters, especially when the first half of the movie is such a slow crawl.

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Suffering from a less than stellar first half, the film manages to make up for it in the second half. Dialogue is incredibly stiff and awkwardly delivered with acting that makes it feel cheesy. Things move at a very slow pace and it creates a very awkward tone. I would have liked to see more time dedicated to demonstrating the tyranny of the wicked witch in Oz to establish her as an evil character. The second half of the film is better and by the climatic battle the characters have worked their charm enough to make it exciting. The digital effects are fantastic and I found myself invested in the action. All said and done there’s enough heart in the movie to make it enjoyable for families as well as fans of the 1939 movie. There are a lot of subtle nods and callbacks that are fun to look out for and even if it is somewhat of a shallow take, it’s cool to see the world of Oz expanded.

Visually Oz the Great and Powerful is a grab bag. Some of the visuals can be distracting and plastic feeling with characters that don’t mesh well enough with the real world, like the river pixies or evil plants in the dark woods. It can make it feel like a very busy candy coated spectacle that feels more like the movie is trying to show off its technical prowess without actually working on story. There are also plenty of gimmicky 3D shots that personally take me out of the film. I’m a fan of 3D when used cleverly but Oz the Great and Powerful tries to shove it in your face. On the other hand China is the strongest animated character of the film and she blended really well with her live action counterparts. The animators did such a wonderful job of conveying so much emotion in the movements and facial expressions on a china doll. Emerald City is a grand spectacle to look at but after a while it loses its luster and you can see how empty it feels and could easily join the ranks of some of the hollow Star War Prequels sets. This can be said about majority of the locations in Oz the Great and Powerful, especially when the live actors are on screen. The movie looks its best as the climatic battle begins in Oz and the heroes begin to set their plan in motion. Everything comes together and looks extremely satisfying on screen.

Overall Oz the Great and Powerful is earnest enough and you can see that it was trying to make the most with what it had. Living up to the 1939 classic was a monumental task and though it didn’t reach that goal it’s still has enough heart and charm to pass as a children’s adventure story and please the more forgiving fans as well as families.

Oz the Great and Powerful features shallow characters, save for two wonderfully written and acted side characters. The movie is earnest and it’s easy to see that it was trying to work with what it had but vanilla story arcs and predictability hamper the film. The antagonists don’t feel that menacing and have motivations that make the film feel like a high school teen drama. Visually the movie is a grab bag ranging from breathtaking scenes to distracting CGI that feel like the movie focused more on showing off its technical prowess than working on story. Story arcs aren’t fully realized on screen and there’s an overall shallow feel to the film. However, the strong second half features enough heart and charm in its characters to pass as a children’s adventure story for the more forgiving fans and families.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at ThinkCinematicReviews@gmail.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: ThinkCinematicReviews@Gmail.com

Snitch


Snitch is a straightforward movie that works hard on its character development. The movie is more of a slow burner than an action packed film, which creates a lot more impactful action and gives a great sense of urgency for the main characters. The cast is solid, save for a few scenes of awkward line delivery. Dwayne Johnson’s relatable performance is enjoyable and worth rooting for. Co-star Jon Bernthal is easily the standout from the crowd and provides emotional depth to the film. Overall, Snitch is entertaining, thoughtful, and moving. There’s an overall loose feel to the movie that prevents the movie from being highly praised, but it does enough to still be a good movie.

For the most part I’ve always been a sucker for father son stories. This aspect is why the movie, Snitch, was appealing for me. I’ve never paid too much attention to Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson movies but this one looked great and I was interested to see how everything would play out.

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Snitch tells the story of a father, John Matthews, who is forced to go into the drug business after his son is mistakenly charged with distribution of illegal drugs. If John Matthews can inform on local drug dealers than he can significantly reduce his son’s jail time.

Despite it’s advertising, Snitch is more of a slow burner family drama than an action packed film. The movie takes its time setting up its characters and story while letting the audience breathe. The pacing can feel a bit odd at times but I was able to look past it given the movie’s great characters. The downside is given the amount of time the movie takes you’d expect a little more impact and closure than the movie provides when all is said and done. Just when the climax starts to heat up things seemed to take an abrupt end and I felt like the ending came off as rushed. The father son aspect of the story felt a little under played and I feel as though the movie functioned more as a glimpse into the drug world as well as its consequences than an examination of the relationship between the father and son.

The action is very subdued in this movie and relies more on tension build up than explosive firefights and car chases. The movie’s calm pacing helps create such a great contrast that when the action scenes do heat up things feel so much more exciting, and since we’ve spent enough time getting to know the characters the action has more meaning. I really enjoyed the way the pacing played out in this movie and the balance between drama and action works great.

Snitch’s strongest aspect is easily its characters. Dwayne Johnson portrays a family man with a lucrative construction business who is faced with a difficult task of getting into the drug world to save his son. Johnson’s performance is relatable, and shows a great deal pain and frustration. It’s a different change of pace not seeing Johnson as the in control action star that we’ve grown accustom to given his repertoire, but it does work.  Some of his line delivery can be a bit awkward but overall I really felt for his character and was entertained by the acting.

Although Johnson gives a solid performance, co-star Jon Bernthal (The Walking Dead) ended up stealing the show for me. Bernthal portrays Daniel James, an ex-con who is trying to turn his life around for his family after being twice convicted with distribution. Bernthal provides a lot of the emotional depth in this film and I found myself so much more invested in his character and family. Bernthal gives an extremely strong performance and my only complaint is that there wasn’t enough closure with his story. He does a great job of portraying his reluctance and showing genuine willingness to turn his life around. His actions felt so much more powerful given the wonderful acting on his part.

Snitch features a wonderful cast who give solid performances. There are a few actors who I felt took me out of the movie from time to time, but it’s nothing drastic. Michael K. Williams and Barry Pepper were also a few other great notable mentions that helped make the film as entertaining as it was. I really liked the relationship between John Matthews and Daniel James and it is interesting to watch things unfold on screen as their different intentions begin to clash.

The film was an overall pleasant surprise that delivers as an entertaining family drama with a hint of action. There are a few instances where I found my suspension of disbelief tested. For instance, when John Matthews enters a drug dealers operation they never once searched him for weapons or a wire. These little details like this in the movie that could have been fixed had things been tighter  but luckily these mistakes aren’t enough to break the movie. There’s an overall loose feel to the movie which prevents the movie from being highly praised.

Snitch is a straightforward movie that works hard on its character development. The movie is more of a slow burner than an action packed film, which creates a lot more impactful action and gives a great sense of urgency for the main characters. The cast is solid, save for a few scenes of awkward line delivery. Dwayne Johnson’s relatable performance is enjoyable and worth rooting for. Co-star Jon Bernthal is easily the standout from the crowd and provides emotional depth to the film. Overall, Snitch is subtle, thoughtful, and moving. There’s an overall loose feel to the movie that prevents the movie from being highly praised, but it does enough to still be a good and entertaining movie.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at ThinkCinematicReviews@gmail.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: ThinkCinematicReviews@Gmail.com

Bullet to the Head


Bullet to the Head will adequately please the action sweet tooth, but aside from that there isn’t much to set it apart from other action movies. Shaky characters, rough script, and a dispensary of one-liners, the movie will struggle to entertain a large audience. Stallone, and Kang work well together but unfortunately their characters are severely underdeveloped and lack any kind of growth to make the end worthwhile.

Riding off the latest trend of 80’s throwback action movies, Bullet to the Head hit theaters this past Friday. Starring Sylvester Stallone, and Sung Kang, the movie aims to bring the nonstop action that fans of Stallone have come to associate with his movies.

Bullet to the head

When a hired hitman, Jimmy Bobo (Stallone), finds himself in the middle of a power struggle mix up, he teams up with Detective Taylor Kwon (Kang), to help get to the bottom of it and avenge his former partner. The two must come to grips with their different stances on moral duty and work together even if it’s on different sides of the law.

Bullet to the Head ends up suffering through some of the same pitfalls that The Last Stand faced. Unfortunately, there’s nothing that helps Bullet to the Head stand apart from other action movies and for most of the ride we’re treading along familiar waters. The thing that makes The Last Stand more appealing is that it tried to have fun with its action where as Bullet to the Head takes itself way too seriously and ends up inducing a lot of eye rolling throughout the movie.

However, the action is entertaining, although maybe too much on the chaotic, shaky cam side. It’s brutal, unforgiving, and fast paced, and of course well done. It’s great to still be able see Stallone on screen dealing out vicious hits and brutal punishments. The movie will have hard time pleasing a large audience, but it does enough to reward action fans.

At its core Bullet to the Head is a revenge movie. There’s no twists or turns, and it plows through for the most part pretty straight forward. The cast is a grab bag. Sylvester Stallone, Sung Kang, and Christian Slater all give enjoyable performance, but as far as the other performers it can get a little disappointing. A lot of the dialogue features the cast spouting off one-liners from scene to scene which I personally tend to like in these types of movies.

One setback for Bullet to the Head is the managing of the two main characters. Kwon is the by-the-law detective who believes in bringing down the most vicious criminals by taking them in. Bobo operates by his own rules, no women, and no children. Everything else is fair game and he’ll do whatever it takes to bring down anyone who wrongs the people he cares about.

The contrast between their moral codes, though familiar, helped set up interesting conflict between the two throughout the movie. The problem being, neither of them really grow enough as characters by the end. Bobo still sticks to his hard-ass way of doing things, and Kwon still believes in a strict by the book approach, even after the two witnessed first hand either extreme is bound to fail at some point. It doesn’t make them appealing as main characters and left me feeling a little lost as for who I was rooting for throughout the movie. It makes it as though the last hour and half built developing these two was for nothing and it just wasn’t satisfying especially given that the duo worked really well together.

The relationship between Kwon and Bobo is great, but way underdeveloped. Kwon’s sarcastic nature is the perfect contrast to Bobo’s too serious mentality, old school toughness, and brash attitude. Constantly mocking the other, the two form a trust, despite a few bumps in the road, and end up saving each other’s lives from time to time. Aside from the action, the movie’s strong point is any time that these two are riffing off each other on screen. The movie missed a real opportunity here to develop Kwon and Bobo more than they did. It would have given the audience more to invest in and feel for, especially as we watch the conflict come to fruition as the other sticks to their moral stance in the end.

Bullet to the Head will adequately please the action sweet tooth, but aside from that there isn’t much to set it apart from other action movies. Shaky characters, rough script, and a dispensary of one-liners, the movie will struggle to entertain a large audience. Stallone, and Kang work well together but unfortunately their characters are severely underdeveloped and lack any kind of growth to make the end worthwhile.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at ThinkCinematicReviews@gmail.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: ThinkCinematicReviews@Gmail.com