A Good Day to Die Hard

A Good Day to Die Hard suffers from a few setbacks. The movie feels less like a Die Hard movie and more about a C.I.A. agent who happens to be John’s son. The movie focuses on this troubled father son relationship and it just creates an awkward and uneven pace for the rest of the film. The lack of a clear and defined villain leaves this movie somewhat forgettable with a missing sense of dire urgency to give importance to our heroes’ actions. However, the action sets are grand and exciting with each one out doing the last. Bruce Willis gets off to a slow start but eventually portrays the witty and wise cracking John McClane we all love. The dynamic between John and Jack McClane will produce laughs but the unfulfilled potential will leave it feeling like a waste. A Good day to Die Hard won’t distance itself from a majority of the other action movies this month but it’s still a fun and exciting movie.

A Good Day to Die Hard finally hit theaters this week after a lot of anticipation on my part. John McClane formed very early impressions for the types of heroes that I enjoyed watching when I was younger. Cracking wise in the face adversity, getting under the skin of the enemy, and being the dependable every man who rises to the occasion despite the circumstances. Any chance that I get to see this character in action is an opportunity worth taking, however has A Good Day to Die Hard squeezed the last drop out of this repeated franchise?

A Good Day to Die Hard
When John McClane finds out that his son has been imprisoned in Moscow he ventures off to rescue him. The reunion isn’t as heartwarming as John expects and he finds himself in the middle of a political terrorist attack. The two must work together and through their differences to save the day and make it out alive.

The film opens with a rather long and deflated intro. It takes its time to set up the threats, as well as introduce John’s son. Even Bruce Willis seems a bit flat in his opening sequences but after about twenty minutes of set up the film starts to liven up as well as the action. The action sequences are big and exciting with each out doing the last. It’s the typical fan fare that we’ve come to expect from the Die Hard series with our favorite character cracking wise. The movie does suffer from the fact that these great sequences have an awkward pace that will make it seem as though this isn’t a Die Hard film.

For the most part A Good Day to Die Hard seems to focus more on Jai Courtney and his character instead of Bruce Willis as John McClane. The movie weaves together Jack McClane’s C.I.A. life with his troubling father issue which leaves little room for John to be John. Of course Willis is still able to deliver his witty lines but due the fact that he plays second fiddle to Jai Courtney, John McClane feels like nothing more than a walking catch phrase machine. These plot lines aren’t bad, but it just doesn’t feel like a Die Hard movie and it definitely doesn’t do Willis/McClane justice. I would have like to see more time to flesh out the villain and give this film some much needed sense of urgency.

The biggest flaw of all is the fact that A Good Day to Die Hard seems to be missing a defined and worthy antagonist. Part of the charm that follows Die Hard is the dynamic and dialogue between John and his enemy. In this film we rarely get to see John and the antagonist interact except for a one five minute scene in the middle of the movie. There’s no back and forth taunting, there’s no moment that makes things personal, nothing that makes it feel as though there’s more to this film than just explosions and gun fire. It only makes it worse that the movie inserts a twist that just makes the villains forgettable and unsatisfying.

Negatives aside I was still able to enjoy A Good Day to Die Hard. Even though John may take a back seat in this film he still offers some enjoyable scenes and gives a very fun performance. The chase scene in the earlier parts of the movie was one of my favorite scenes from the movie and it really sets the tone for the type of fun action that the movie pulls off. It won’t distance itself from a majority of the other action movies that have been coming out this month but it’s still a fun ride.

Despite my complaints of the father son story, I do like the dynamic that was attempted it just wasn’t executed well enough. Jai Courtney and Bruce Willis work well together and it’s fun to watch the scenes unfold as they go back and forth with each other. I wouldn’t mind seeing Jai Courtney return as Willis sidekick but he needs to have more character than just gritting his teeth and showing reluctance to his father’s good intentions. The potential dynamic is there, but it definitely needs some work.

A Good Day to Die Hard suffers from a few setbacks. The movie feels less like a Die Hard movie and more about a C.I.A. agent who happens to be John’s son. The movie focuses on this troubled father son relationship and it just creates an awkward and uneven pace for the rest of the film. The lack of a clear and defined villain leaves this movie somewhat forgettable with a missing sense of dire urgency to give importance to our heroes’ actions. However, the action sets are grand and exciting with each one out doing the last. Bruce Willis gets off to a slow start but eventually portrays the witty and wise cracking John McClane we all love. The dynamic between John and Jack McClane will produce laughs but the unfulfilled potential will leave it feeling like a waste. A Good day to Die Hard won’t distance itself from a majority of the other action movies this month but it’s still a fun and exciting movie.

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Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
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2 responses to “A Good Day to Die Hard

  1. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of February 18th | Thinking Cinematic

  2. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of June 3rd | Thinking Cinematic

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