Identity Thief

Identity Thief features crass sexual humor, but it doesn’t go without pulling on some heartstrings. The movie isn’t perfect by any means but it is still an enjoyable ride. Fans of Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman will be pleased to see the duo give good performances but for everyone else it’ll be a bumpy ride. The make or break deal for Identity Thief rests with the viewer’s ability to suspended disbelief and tough out its slow start.

Opening this weekend, I decided to check out Identity Thief starring, Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy. After an inconvenient trip to the gas station, Sandy Bigelow Patterson discovers that his credit cards have been maxed out. Upon further investigation he discovers that a woman of the same name miles away from his home has stolen his identity. In order to protect his identity and restore his credit he has to travel there and back again in an attempt to bring the con artist to justice.

Identiy Thief

 

The thing to keep in mind with Identity Thief is that from the get go believability is thrown right out the window. Sandy Paterson (Bateman) is a financial accountant who is regarded the best of the best. However, after a mysterious phone call with a supposed credit protection agency, he willingly gives out important information right over the phone. There are little moments like these throughout the movie that doesn’t establish a very convincing credibility. A lot of the films issues could have been resolved had the characters taken the time to actually communicate instead of just playing dumb. The first thirty minutes of the movie were rough to get through, seeing as how it did take sometime to get the ball rolling, however, once I stopped worrying about the movie’s believability and started enjoying the lead duo, I started warming up to Identity Thief.

Melissa McCarthy’s character, Sandy, is a con artist who prints out credit cards like it’s going out of style. Seemingly a hardened criminal, it’s revealed early on that Sandy is actually an insecure person who uses these stolen shopping sprees as a way to mask her depression. It’s hard not to feel sorry for Sandy but not without having a bitter taste. She’s crass, rude, and of course, a life ruining identity thief. However, there’s more to her character than she lets on and we see a great deal of change throughout the movie. McCarthy does a wonderful job of playing this hardened but insecure thief and is able to deftly deliver her absurd lines in a humorous fashion.

Jason Bateman’s character, Sandy Patterson, is extremely likeable. Life is going perfect for Sandy Patterson, and his family is never better. I really loved the Patterson family dynamic. The scenes involving the family are playful, heartwarming, and genuine. It helped make Sandy Patterson’s quest that much more dire after being invested in his family back home. Bateman plays the familiar, in the wrong place at the wrong time character, but he does a fantastic job with it. I didn’t agree with some of the choices that his character made, but overall I was pleased with his performance.

Bateman and McCarthy work really well together and help to bring the laughs to this movie. The jokes do become a bit too spread out at times, but once things get moving the two, as well as the audience start to have fun. It was nice to see a lot of familiar TV faces, in particular Eric Stonestreet of Modern Family fame. His brief scenes as Big Chuck were extremely funny albeit pretty vulgar. It was right around the time that Stonestreet’s character, Big Chuck, was introduced that I found myself giving into the charm of Identity Thief. There’s something about the two and their ridiculous situations that kept me invested and wondering how things would finally play out.

At its core Identity Thief is a buddy trip movie with a different spin. There are elements of a cat and mouse feel but none of these seemed to be fully developed. Early on in the film we find out that Sandy (McCarthy) has pissed off two hardened criminals after scamming them with fake credit cards. The criminals serve nothing more than the catalyst for the road trip to begin, and we rarely see them interact with the lead duos after that. They’re not the only ones on the hunt for Sandy Patterson though. Robert Patrick plays Skiptracer, a collection agent hired to bring in Sandy (McCarthy). He plays a more significant role than the two criminals and does provide some obstacles for the leads to face. However, both antagonists felt irrelevant and didn’t add that much to the film. I feel as though if they would have picked one antagonists and fleshed it out more it wouldn’t have felt as jumbled.

Overall, Identity Thief features a few great laughs and a few heart warming feel good scenes.. Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy put in a lot of work to make the film enjoyable. Together the two create a duo that you grow to love and a relationship that hits some emotional turning points. The movie may not be the most coherent and believable but that doesn’t mean it’s still not enjoyable.

Identity Thief features crass sexual humor, but it doesn’t go without pulling on some heartstrings. The movie isn’t perfect by any means but it is still an enjoyable ride. Fans of Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman will be pleased to see the duo give good performances but for everyone else it’ll be a bumpy ride. The make or break deal for Identity Thief rests with the viewer’s ability to suspended disbelief and tough out its slow start.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at ThinkCinematicReviews@gmail.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: ThinkCinematicReviews@Gmail.com

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2 responses to “Identity Thief

  1. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of February 11th | Thinking Cinematic

  2. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of June 3rd | Thinking Cinematic

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