Life of Pi

The visuals in Life of Pi are an amazing work of art that is extremely awe-inspiring. It’s also one of the rare movies who benefits more from 3D than in a traditional experience. The movie’s laid back and conversational tone is endearing but the straightforward path of the movie may leave those wanting for more. Life of Pi lacks the emotional closer that will sell for most audiences, but the film’s story reveals its multitude of layers at the end and becomes a richer experience with hindsight.

The thing I liked the most about Life of Pi was the conversational tone it had in the early part of the movie. Pi’s story is shown through narrative flashbacks that are broken up with scenes between adult Pi and the writer. It had a nice relaxing feel and which made it seem as though the experience was like catching up with old friends. Some parts of the story were a bit cheesy, but still entertaining.

 

The thing I liked the most about Life of Pi was the conversational tone it had in the early part of the movie. Pi’s story is shown through narrative flashbacks that are broken up with scenes between adult Pi and the writer. It had a nice relaxing feel and which made it seem as though the experience was like catching up with old friends. Some parts of the story were a bit cheesy, but still entertaining.

Of course, the meat of the movie takes place at sea with Pi’s only companion a Bengal Tiger named Richard Parker. The struggle that they go through to survive the elements as well as each other is entertaining on the surface but so much more meaningful with hindsight. The movie was a bit on the long side and I felt like the movie lacked a strong enough emotional closer to make the long adventure fulfilling. The more I thought about the movie and really focused on the movie’s themes, the more I liked it. However, I don’t feel like the themes were hammered in thoroughly enough, which made me feel as though something were missing.

The strength of this movie is of course in its visuals. There were a ton of amazing scenes that blended the sea and skyline and left such a vast empty feeling around Pi. The imagery conveyed so much and was so visually rewarding that I was in awe for majority of the film. I know 3D has a polarizing effect on people, but I couldn’t help but feel that it actually enhanced Life of Pi. The underwater scenes benefited the most from the depth enhancing 3D creating a strong sense of helplessness while Pi struggles for safety. The movie uses a lot of CGI animals, which has a tendency to make or break a film. It’s a fine line to walk before the believability is broken and takes the audience out of the film. However, Life of Pi blended the line between real and animated well enough that it wasn’t a distraction. Life of Pi is an easy contender for one of the best looking movies of this year.

Out of all its technological achievements the tiger sits at the top spot. The companionship between Pi and Richard Parker was such a pivotal part of the story that the film couldn’t have succeeded without the amazing work done. The CGI captured the subtleties of the wild animal and gave life to such a fierce beast with emotional depth. There were many moments in the film where I found myself tense with fear as Pi and Richard Park struggle for dominance out at sea. The tiger is so well done that it’s easy to connect and care for the Tiger just as easy as it is to care for Pi.

The visuals in Life of Pi are an amazing work of art that is extremely awe-inspiring. It’s also one of the rare movies who benefits more from 3D than in a traditional experience. The movie’s laid back and conversational tone is endearing but the straightforward path of the movie may leave those wanting for more. Life of Pi lacks the emotional closer that will sell for most audiences, but the film’s story reveals its multitude of layers at the end and becomes a richer experience with hindsight.

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Email: Rrsolis@me.com

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One response to “Life of Pi

  1. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of March 11th | Thinking Cinematic

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