Lincoln

Lincoln brings numerous amounts of strong performances to deliver the wonderfully and eloquently written dialogue. Daniel Day-Lewis brings Lincoln back to life and is able to engage and captivate audiences with a performance that is an easy contender for best performance of the year. The film depicts tense moments from such a pivotal moment in our history that Lincoln teaches as well as entertains. It’ll be hard to leave the theater without feeling inspired and in awe after seeing Lincoln.

I often make the joke that I know enough to know that I really don’t know that much, which of course is something I try to take small steps to improve. That’s why I love and look forward to period pieces. It gives me a chance to begin groundwork, a sort of jumping off point to dig deeper into certain topics. With Lincoln releasing this weekend, I found myself drawn to the theater to see what I could learn from this film and to see what further interest Spielberg’s Lincoln would spark.

Lincoln focuses on the last four months of Abraham Lincoln’s life, and of course the political struggle towards abolishing slavery and ending the Civil War. The film also offers insight with Lincoln and his family, specifically the relationship with his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln.

Throughout the movie I couldn’t help but continually noting just how insanely clever and sharp the dialogue was. Everyone in the film had moments of dialogue that were remarkably well written. From emotionally moving speeches to stinging quips, the actors delivered many lines that inspired such strong reactions from the audiences and myself. There were as many, ‘oh’s’, from the crowd as there were moments of hushed silence as we sat and lingered of each word spoken. Even when the actors weren’t in scenes that were suppose to spark such strong emotion, the way the words were so beautifully written and eloquently spoken made the film a true delight to watch unfold. It goes hand and hand of course, and these words couldn’t reach their full potential were it not for the capable actors behind them.

The performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln was so powerful, and so emotionally genuine that it will be revered for many years to come. Lewis captures the charming and charismatic nature of Lincoln while displaying such strong credibility to the point where it’s uncanny. My favorite moments in the film are when Lincoln pauses to share a story that he relates back to whatever problem that’s at hand. Lewis masterfully tells his stories engaging the audience so that it feels as though he’s speaking straight through the screen. A story in particular involves a George Washington painting that had the audience rolling in laughter by the end. It’s these small stories that Lincoln interjects that help strengthen his character and offers a more humanizing portrayal to the man we think we know. The interpersonal relationships he shares with his coworkers and his family grounds this portrayal and demonstrates the loving and intellectual side of Lincoln. This enabled the film to show the incredible poise Lincoln had in the face of adversity, family struggle, and the responsibilities as president.

It’s easy to just single out Daniel Day-Lewis when it comes to the performances but every actor in this movie brought an amazing intensity to this movie. Tommy Lee Jones plays Thaddeus Stevens whose swift brutal remarks stuns and humors as he habitually interjects in the House to make his opinion known. Sally Fields as Marry Todd Lincoln shows such strong emotional turmoil over the loss of her son all while showing the many strong faces she wore to uphold her part as First Lady. David Strathairn, as Secretary of the State William Seward, shares such an awesome on screen dynamic with Lewis as he zealously does his best to stay on top of Lincoln and advise as best as he can. These are just the top of such a great cast that had a few great surprises.

Honestly, I was worried, especially with the movie sitting at two plus hours that I would feel lost or unable to follow along but the movie progresses smoothly enough that it’s both entertaining and informative. Even though the movie was two plus hours, I never felt like the movie dragged and was surprised to see how quick it went by. The fact that the movie does such a great job of grounding Abraham, it helps creates such a loveable depiction that following along with his day to day activities was a captivating experience. Also seeing the events that took place in such a pivotal point in our history was inspiring and offered moments of great introspection. The way slavery was so haphazardly talked about by those who supported was almost laughable, not to any discredit to the movie, but to how silly it sounded in retrospect, and it left me wondering what we accept so commonly now that will be silly to us hundreds of years from now. It’s the moments like this in the film that helped capture the amazing foresight Lincoln had for his time.

Lincoln brings numerous amounts of strong performances to deliver the wonderfully and eloquently written dialogue. Daniel Day-Lewis brings Lincoln back to life and is able to engage and captivate audiences with a performance that is an easy contender for best performance of the year. The film depicts tense moments from such a pivotal moment in our history that Lincoln teaches as well as entertains. It’ll be hard to leave the theater without feeling inspired and in awe after seeing Lincoln.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at rrsolis@me.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:
Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: Rrsolis@me.com

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One response to “Lincoln

  1. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of March 25th | Thinking Cinematic

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