Cloud Atlas

For all its oddities, Cloud Atlas is a moving and beautiful movie. It’s not a movie for everybody, but those who can follow along will find an enjoyable ride full of twist and turns that’ll push you past your comfort zones as well as provide some interesting food for thought. Cloud Atlas, with its impressive music, its intricate storytelling, and its beautiful performances delivers a wonderful message that is uplifting as well as universal.

When the trailers for Cloud Atlas hit the Internet I made it a point to try and avoid them entirely. The trailers were so highly talked about that I wanted to be able to see the movie with little prior knowledge. Although I ended up eventually seeing the trailers before hand I still had a very flimsy grasp on what the movie was about. Even having seen it I know that it’ll take multiple viewings before I’m able to grasp the full extent of the movie.


The most impressive aspect of Cloud Atlas is its massive scope. The movie is comprised of six different stories that are linked together in some way. It’s ambitious, thought provoking, and extremely fleshed out. Visually the movie is stunning with sets that were impressively detailed and beautifully designed with rich history. The six stories take the audience from vast blue oceans, dark green forests, as well as a cold and dystopian future with flying vehicles zooming past endless skyscrapers. The characters were also fantastic and lead stories that were intriguing. My favorite in particular told the story of a young English musician serving as an amanuensis for a fellow composer. The young character’s dialogue was beautifully written and offered unique perspectives.

Another one of Cloud Atlas’ distinct attributes is that the main actors play various different roles in each of the six different stories. For the most part this is interesting but at times I felt like it was somewhat distracting. However, the end credits display every actor’s character and I was taken by surprise on a few characters. The performances were strong and entertaining.

I’d be lying if I didn’t mention that at times the movie felt like things were a bit weird and jumbled. In the beginning when the stories are constantly switching on screen it was somewhat of an annoyance as well as overwhelming. As massive as this movie was, it took some time getting a good grasp on the story. My fear going into the movie was that it was going to be overly complex and a chore to follow. However, once the movie hits its stride and the audience gets accustom to the style, the movie loses the jumbled up sense and becomes a truly unique experience.

I had some trouble understanding some character’s dialogue, particularly so with one of Tom Hank’s character, Zachary. In fact, his whole tribe spoke in a different dialect and by the movie’s end I never felt like it became easier to understand. This was disappointing and I felt like I missed out on some really pivotal scenes due to the inability to hear and understand what they were saying.

I couldn’t even begin to analyze each and every story in Cloud Atlas with just one viewing. At its core, every story strongly resonates with pure human emotion and spirit. I left the theater feeling refreshed and rejuvenated. Even with it’s odd moments, Cloud Atlas made such a strong impression that I was left ruminating on the movie for hours after the credits had rolled. With stories as impressive as the six told in Cloud Atlas, it’s hard not to be moved by at least one of them. Although the movie is long, and somewhat hard to consume, the bigger picture is worth it in the end.

For all its oddities, Cloud Atlas is a moving and beautiful movie. It’s not a movie for everybody, but those who can follow along will find an enjoyable ride full of twist and turns that’ll push you past your comfort zones as well as provide some interesting food for thought. Cloud Atlas, with its impressive music, its intricate storytelling, and its beautiful performances delivers a wonderful message that is uplifting as well as universal.

Interested in writing reviews or news posts for Thinking Cinematic? Contact me at rrsolis@me.com! You can also send your guest reviews there too!

Connect with me at:

Twitter: @Treyrs20o9
Twitter: @Think_Cinematic
Email: Rrsolis@me.com

Advertisements

2 responses to “Cloud Atlas

  1. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of April 29th | Thinking Cinematic

  2. Pingback: Movie Monday Update Week of May 13th | Thinking Cinematic

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s